As our country has experienced significant population shifts over the last 150 years with fewer Americans living or working on farms, the visibility surrounding the value of farming has diminished.

Our country has experienced significant population shifts over the last 150 years with fewer Americans living or working on farms, the visibility surrounding the value of farming has diminished.  In what would be his final annual message to Congress, Lincoln called USDA "The People's Department,” because at that time about half of all Americans lived on farms, compared with only about two percent today. But through work on food, agriculture, economic development, science, natural resource conservation and a host of issues, USDA still fulfills Lincoln's vision - touching the lives of all Americans every day.  Though more Americans now live in suburban areas than on farms, our dependence on agriculture remains the same.

As part of its 150th anniversary celebrations, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) invites youth and adult 4-H members to submit photos that capture the diverse ways young people are engaged in agriculture today and the impact it has on communities.

 Contestants must be a 4-H member, volunteer, alumni or staff and 14 years of age or older. All photographs must be taken by an amateur photographer.  Photos should reflect on one of three areas of focus: citizenship in agricultural issues, how agriculture affects healthy living, and the science behind agriculture.  The winning photographs will be prominently displayed within the 4-H/USDA Headquarters in Washington, D.C., during National 4-H Week, October 1-6, 2012.

 4-H has been an integral part of USDA’s rich history, with the formation of boys’ and girls’ agricultural clubs in 1902 and the establishment of the Cooperative Extension System in 1914. The history of 4-H reflects that young people are early adopters of innovation and can change a community or influence societal changes.

View full rules

How to enter

Submit your photo through the Enter a Submission function on Challenge.gov.  Make sure you enter your full caption in the Description field. Scan and upload the completed entry form, copyright permission form and subject consent release forms in the Upload a File field through the Enter a Submission function.  See the full rules for more details and to access all necessary forms.

Judges

No avatar 100

4-H National Headquarters/National Institute of Food and Agriculture

Judging Criteria

  • Citizenship in Agricultural Issues
  • How Agriculture Effects Healthy Living
  • The Science Behind Agriculture